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King John Affixes His Seal to the Magna Carta, an Inspiration for the US Constitution and Bill of Rights

King John Affixes His Seal to the Magna Carta, an Inspiration for the US Constitution and Bill of Rights

"The democratic aspiration is no mere recent phase in human history . . . It was written in Magna Carta." --Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1941 Inaugural address On June 15, 1215, in a field at Runnymede, King John affixed his seal to Magna Carta. Confronted by 40 rebellious barons, he consented ...
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The Chilling True Story Behind the Pied Piper of Hamelin

The Chilling True Story Behind the Pied Piper of Hamelin

If you watch enough horror movies, sooner or later you’ll hear a character utter a variation on the phrase, “Every legend has a basis in fact.” Whether or not that statement is true, it is a fact that many of our most outlandish fables and fictions are rooted, at least ...
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The Edict of Expulsion: The Expulsion of the Jews by King Edward I was Not Due to their Money Lending Alone but Also Due to Blood Ritual Sacrifices

The Edict of Expulsion: The Expulsion of the Jews by King Edward I was Not Due to their Money Lending Alone but Also Due to Blood Ritual Sacrifices

The Edict of Expulsion was an act of Edward I which expelled all Jews from the kingdom of England. To understand why why Edward acted in this way, you have to go back in history. Biblical exhortations against the lending of money led to an attitude among the inhabitants of ...
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Europe's Black Death: Scientists say Fleas and Body Lice Spread by Humans, not Rats, were Responsible for Killing 50 million people

Europe’s Black Death: Scientists say Fleas and Body Lice Spread by Humans, not Rats, were Responsible for Killing 50 million people

Every child learns at school that the Black Death was spread by rats which carried infected fleas. But the textbooks may need to be changed, as a new study suggests rodents have been unfairly blamed for the plague which killed millions of people across medieval Europe. The Black Death, it ...
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John Ball, a leader in the Peasants' Revolt, is hung, drawn and quartered in the presence of Richard II of England

John Ball, a leader in the Peasants’ Revolt, is hung, drawn and quartered in the presence of Richard II of England

John Ball was born in St Albans in about 1340. Twenty years later he was working as a priest in York. He eventually became the priest St James' Church in Colchester. (1) Ball believed it was wrong that some people in England were very rich while others were very poor ...
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John Wycliffe, the First to Translate the Entire Bible into English, Dies

John Wycliffe, the First to Translate the Entire Bible into English, Dies

Wycliffe had been born in the hinterlands, on a sheep farm 200 miles from London. He left for Oxford University in 1346, but because of periodic eruptions of the Black Death, he was not able to earn his doctorate until 1372. Nonetheless, by then he was already considered Oxford's leading ...
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Religious Reformer, Jan Hus, Burned at the Stake as a Heretic

Religious Reformer, Jan Hus, Burned at the Stake as a Heretic

Jan Hus, a Bohemian religious reformer, was condemned as a heretic and burned at the stake for his belief that Christ alone was the head of the church and that people should be permitted to read the Bible in their own language and in their own homes. Manuscripts of Wycliffe's ...
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Joan of Arc Burnt at the Stake in Rouen's Market Square in France

Joan of Arc Burnt at the Stake in Rouen’s Market Square in France

A young peasant girl who could neither read nor write, she followed the voices and visions from God and completely reversed the course of the 100 Year War (with England occupying most cities) and kept France from becoming a colony of England. Greatly celebrated by her own people she was ...
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Italian Navigator, Amerigo Vespucci, is born in Florence, Italy

Italian Navigator, Amerigo Vespucci, is born in Florence, Italy

He played a significant role in the establishment of America. He was the first to establish that America was a new continent and not a part of Asia. Amerigo's legacy is not only his name, but in his dignity and devotion to the divine. Amerigo had believed for years before ...
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Europe’s First Mass-produced Book - the Gutenberg Bible - was Printed with Movable Type in Mainz, Germany

Europe’s First Mass-produced Book – the Gutenberg Bible – was Printed with Movable Type in Mainz, Germany

Though it is not certain, many scholars agree that the Gutenberg Bible was published in Mainz, Germany on this day. The printing of the Gutenberg Latin language Bible was one of the most significant events that took place in human history. Prior to 1455, books were mainly in possessions of ...
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Italian Explorer Christopher Columbus Discovered the "New World" of the Americas on an Expedition 'Led by Hand of God'

Italian Explorer Christopher Columbus Discovered the “New World” of the Americas on an Expedition ‘Led by Hand of God’

On several occasions Columbus gave credit to the Almighty. In writing to the Spanish leaders, he said, “Our Lord unlocked my mind, sent me upon the sea, and gave me fire for the deed. Who heard of my enterprise, called it foolish, mocked me, and laughed. But who can doubt ...
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The 'Cosmographiae Introductio' is Printed and Suggests the Name "America" for the New World after Explorer Americus Vespuccius (Latin)

The ‘Cosmographiae Introductio’ is Printed and Suggests the Name “America” for the New World after Explorer Americus Vespuccius (Latin)

AMERICA, we learn as schoolchildren, was named in honor of Amerigo Vespucci, for his discovery of the mainland of the New World. We tend not to question this lesson about the naming of America. By the time we are adults it lingers vaguely in most of us, along with images ...
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Michelangelo Unveiled the Unfinished Painted Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo Unveiled the Unfinished Painted Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel

All of Rome waited in expectation. For months, Michelangelo Buonarroti had worked in secret. Curiosity was aflame. What had he accomplished? Had he succeeded in transferring his skill as a sculptor to work with fresco (paint in plaster)? Pope Julius II, as impatient as ever, demanded that Michelangelo unveil the ...
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Erasmus Published a Greek-Latin Parallel New Testament

Erasmus Published a Greek-Latin Parallel New Testament

Erasmus, with the help of printer John Froben, published a Greek-Latin Parallel New Testament. The Latin part was not the corrupt Vulgate, but his own fresh rendering of the text from the more accurate and reliable Greek, which he had managed to collate from a half-dozen partial old Greek New ...
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Protestant Reformation Begins: Martin Luther Nailed his 95 Theses to the Door of the Wittenberg Castle Church, Protesting the Sale of Indulgences and Other Practices

Protestant Reformation Begins: Martin Luther Nailed his 95 Theses to the Door of the Wittenberg Castle Church, Protesting the Sale of Indulgences and Other Practices

Sometime during October 31, 1517, the day before the Feast of All Saints, the 33-year-old Martin Luther posted theses on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg. The door functioned as a bulletin board for various announcements related to academic and church affairs. The theses were written in Latin ...
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Religious Reformer William Tyndale Burned at the Stake for Trying to Make the Bible Available to Common People

Religious Reformer William Tyndale Burned at the Stake for Trying to Make the Bible Available to Common People

William Tyndale, 12 years after he left England, was led from prison to the stake where he was strangled, then his body burned. He had time to utter one last cry: “Lord, open the King of England’s eyes.” Tyndale had suffered for the cause “poverty, … exile out of my ...
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John Rogers is Burned to Death at the Stake in Smithfield, England. The First of Queen "Bloody" Mary's Reign

John Rogers is Burned to Death at the Stake in Smithfield, England. The First of Queen “Bloody” Mary’s Reign

John Rogers burned to death at a stake at Smithfield, England on this Monday morning, February 4,1555. Among the onlookers who encouraged him were his own children. What monstrous crime had earned him this cruel death? Born about 1500, Rogers was educated at Cambridge. He became a Catholic priest and ...
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The Oxford Martyrs: Bishops Ridley and Latimer Burned

The Oxford Martyrs: Bishops Ridley and Latimer Burned

In Oxford's St Giles there is a huge Victorian memorial to the Oxford Martyrs, close to the spot where they were burned at the stake. Today marks 460 years since the deaths of two of them, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer, in 1555. The third, Thomas Cranmer, was burnt five ...
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The French Christian Huguenots in Florida set a day of Thanksgiving and offered the first Protestant prayer in North America

The French Christian Huguenots in Florida set a day of Thanksgiving and offered the first Protestant prayer in North America

Commemorating the French Huguenots and their attempt at seeking religious freedom in America, Rep. Charles E. Bennett sponsored a bill on Sept. 21, 1950, to establish the Fort Caroline National Memorial. In 1989, he recited the history: “The 425th anniversary of the beginning settlements by Europeans … renamed from Fort ...
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St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre

St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre

On this day commenced this diabolical act of sanguinary brutality. It was intended to destroy at one stroke the root of the Protestant tree, which had only before partially suffered in its branches. The king of France had artfully proposed a marriage, between his sister and the prince of Navarre, ...
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The Defeat of the Spanish Armada

In 1588, the most powerful man in the world was the King of Spain, Phillip II. Flush with gold and silver from the New World, he had no rivals, save one: Queen Elizabeth of England. England was a Protestant nation and Spain was Catholic, as was most of Europe. In ...
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“Speech to the Troops at Tilbury” by Queen Elizabeth I of England

“Speech to the Troops at Tilbury” by Queen Elizabeth I of England

The Speech to the Troops at Tilbury was delivered on 9 August Old Style, 19 August New Style 1588 by Queen Elizabeth I of England to the land forces earlier assembled at Tilbury in Essex in preparation for repelling the expected invasion by the Spanish Armada. Prior to the speech ...
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Gunpowder Plot: Guy Fawkes a False Flag Patsy?

Gunpowder Plot: Guy Fawkes a False Flag Patsy?

Is the story we've been taught about the Gunpowder plot really treason by Guy Fawkes and the group of Catholic men, or has history gone the way of the victors once again? What we're told... As midnight approaches on November the 4th – the eve of the traditional opening of Parliament – ...
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Jamestown, the first Permanent British Settlement in America, is Established in Virginia

Jamestown, the first Permanent British Settlement in America, is Established in Virginia

Funded by The Virginia Company of England, a group of Englishmen sail to the new, mysterious land, which they called Virginia in honor of Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen, and begin a settlement. The company had given them rules that no one was to own private property and that they ...
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The Mayflower Compact is Signed by 41 English Colonists Onboard the Mayflower

The Mayflower Compact is Signed by 41 English Colonists Onboard the Mayflower

The Mayflower Compact, signed by 41 English colonists on the ship Mayflower,  was the first written framework of government established in what is now the United States. The compact was drafted to prevent dissent amongst Puritans and non-separatist Pilgrims who had landed at Plymouth a few days earlier. Before being ...
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The Mayflower Pilgrims Land and Found Plymouth Led by William Bradford

The Mayflower Pilgrims Land and Found Plymouth Led by William Bradford

The Pilgrims fled from England to Holland in 1607. When Spain threatened to invade Holland, the Pilgrims decided to flee again. They considered sailing to Guyana in South America, as they heard of its tropical climate. Pilgrim Governor William Bradford wrote in Of Plymouth Plantation: “Some … had thoughts and ...
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The First Thanksgiving Occurred between Sept 21st and Nov 9th, 1621

The First Thanksgiving Occurred between Sept 21st and Nov 9th, 1621

The unfamiliar American soil presented problems to the Pilgrims, but an Indian named Samoset greeted them and taught them how to fertilize best fertilize the soil. The results (months later) were spectacular, and the Pilgrims had much to be thankful for in the new land. About 100 Indians were invited ...
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The Second Thanksgiving: Governor Bradford Proclaims November 29 a Day of Thanksgiving

The Second Thanksgiving: Governor Bradford Proclaims November 29 a Day of Thanksgiving

In 1623, a period of drought was answered by colonists with a proclamation of prayer and fasting. This prayer and fasting was changed to another thanksgiving celebration when rains came during the prayers. Later that year, Governor Bradford proclaimed November 29 as a time for pilgrims to gather and give ...
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The 'Petition of Right' Approved by King Charles I in England

The ‘Petition of Right’ Approved by King Charles I in England

The Petition of Right (see document) is a statement of the objectives of the 1628 English legal reform movement that led to the Civil War and deposing of Charles I in 1649. One of England's most famous Constitutional documents, it expresses many of the ideals that later led to the ...
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Galileo Convicted of Heresy for Teaching the Heliocentric System of the Earth Revolving Around the Sun

Galileo Convicted of Heresy for Teaching the Heliocentric System of the Earth Revolving Around the Sun

Despite the considerable evidence that the Bible provided the necessary intellectual basis for science, atheists often claim that, historically, science and religion have been at war. For centuries, they say, the church opposed the advancement of science and human progress in general. When asked for evidence in support of this ...
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