Antibiotics

Deemed the “miracle drug” in the 1940s, antibiotics has helped cure many infectious diseases, and they only work on infections by bacteria, not viruses. Overuse and misuse of antibiotics can result in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, which have their own slew of problems. Over the decades these tiny microbes have begun to evade the drugs used to kill them, leading WHO to declare: “The world is heading toward a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries, which has been treatable for decades, can once again kill.” Antibiotics are now overused not only in humans, but in livestock, and are even sprayed on crops, painted on the hulls of boats, and dumped in rivers. Adverse reactions, increased risk of diabetes and bowel cancer, gut damage, and disabling of the immune system are some of the risks of antibiotics. READ MORE…

Gut Bacteria Is Key Factor in Childhood Obesity

Gut Bacteria Is Key Factor in Childhood Obesity

New information published by scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Health suggests that gut bacteria and its interactions with immune cells and metabolic organs, including fat tissue, play a key role in childhood obesity. “The medical community used to think that obesity was a result of consuming too many calories. However, a series of studies over the past decade has confirmed that the microbes living in our ...
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Antibiotics: Even Low Use In Children Can Have A Negative Impact On Health – New Research

Antibiotics: Even Low Use In Children Can Have A Negative Impact On Health – New Research

GPs in the UK carry out over 300m patient consultations every year and at least a quarter of these deal with children. Almost two-thirds of such appointments are for coughs, sore throats, or earaches – illnesses which young children commonly get. Doctors and nurses group these types of illnesses as “acute respiratory tract infections”. They are considered to be “self-limiting”, meaning that antibiotics have little or no benefit ...
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Study: 81% of Antibiotics Prescribed by Dentists ‘Unnecessary’

Study: 81% of Antibiotics Prescribed by Dentists ‘Unnecessary’

Oregon State University CORVALLIS, Ore. - Antibiotics prescribed by dentists as a preemptive strike against infection are unnecessary 81% of the time, according to a study published today in JAMA Network Open. The findings are important because dentists are responsible for 10% of all antibiotic prescriptions written in the United States. Antibiotics prescribed when not warranted expose patients to the risk of side effects unnecessarily and ...
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Huge Lawsuit Accuses nearly 20 Big Drug Companies, a Billionaire, and 2 Brothers-in-law of Cozying up to Hike Drug Prices

Huge Lawsuit Accuses nearly 20 Big Drug Companies, a Billionaire, and 2 Brothers-in-law of Cozying up to Hike Drug Prices

When the New Jersey drugmaker Heritage Pharmaceuticals was laying plans to start selling a new drug in early 2013, a high-ranking employee asked a colleague to get on a call with the vice president of a rival, according to newly revealed allegations in a massive federal lawsuit. The goal, according to an email referred to in the civil suit, was to "discuss strategy." Heritage's leader, Jason ...
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Study: Rebalancing the Gut Improves Symptoms of Autism

Study: Rebalancing the Gut Improves Symptoms of Autism

(Natural News) The evidence is growing that gut bacteria is connected to the brain, and a recent study shows how this link can be used to help people with autism. Human gut bacteria needs to maintain the right balance for optimal health and immunity. The ideal ratio is believed to be somewhere around 85 percent “good” bacteria to 15 percent “bad” bacteria. The right ratio allows ...
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Study Shows Antibiotics Contribute to Cancer

Study Shows Antibiotics Contribute to Cancer

A 2008 study of 3,000,000 people divided the participants into groups that had taken no antibiotics for the past two years, those that had taken 2-5 prescriptions and those that had taken six or more prescriptions in the same time period.  Participants were tracked for six years afterwards.  Those who had taken 2-5 antibiotic prescriptions had a 27% increase in cancers compared to those who took none.  Those who ...
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