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2010s | 2000-09 | 1990s | 1980s | 1970s | 1960s | 1950s | 1940s | 1930s | 1920s | 1910s | 1900-09 | 1800s | 1700s | 1600s | 1500s | 1400s | 1300s | 1200s | Full TimelineTop 100 Conspiracies

14th Amendment to the Constitution is Adopted

14th Amendment to the Constitution is Adopted

One reason government is so powerful and we the people weak is the 14th amendment. From its inception it has diminished personal freedom, is the vanguard for Federal domination of private property, and the overpowering destruction of our congressional right for self-government at state and local levels. Using court injunction orders along with operative efforts of withdrawing federal funding, the Federal Government can control and force ...
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The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

This is the 'official story' from Wikipedia: The impeachment of Andrew Johnson occurred in 1868, when the United States House of Representatives resolved to impeach U.S. President Andrew Johnson, adopting eleven articles of impeachment detailing his "high crimes and misdemeanors", in accordance with Article Two of the United States Constitution. The House's primary charge against Johnson was violation of the Tenure of Office Act, passed by ...
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Andrew Johnson: "We have seen this Congress pretend to be for the Union, when its every step and act tended to perpetuate disunion and make a disruption..."

Andrew Johnson: “We have seen this Congress pretend to be for the Union, when its every step and act tended to perpetuate disunion and make a disruption…”

Andrew Johnson exposes the Radical Republicans that were actually working to radicalize America. These radical republicans (illuminati agents) were not about to allow Johnson to expose them, so they began a smear campaign and a plan to impeach him. The third attempt was a charm - at least in the House of Representatives, but the Senate voted against impeachment. The smears were to make him appear ...
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Alice in Wonderland is Published

Alice in Wonderland is Published

Alice in Wonderland was published by Lewis Carroll (a pseudoname for English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) on November 26, 1865, three years after Dodgson and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862, up the Isis with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell, including 10 year old Alice Liddell from whom Alice is named. It tells of a girl named Alice falling ...
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Assassination of Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth, but Why?

Assassination of Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth, but Why?

Mimi L. Eustis, the daughter of Samuel Todd Churchill, a high level member of the secret New Orleans Mardi Gras Society called "The Mystick Crewe of Comus" recorded her fathers secret knowledge in his deathbed confessions. This Society, which reorganized the Mardi Gras festivities in 1857, was a chapter of the Skull and Bones that began as a front for the activities of Masons Albert Pike, Judah ...
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Abraham Lincoln's Delivers his Gettysburg Address

Abraham Lincoln’s Delivers his Gettysburg Address

On June 1, 1865, Senator Charles Sumner referred to the most famous speech ever given by President Abraham Lincoln. In his eulogy on the slain president, he called the Gettysburg Address a "monumental act." He said Lincoln was mistaken that "the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here." Rather, the Bostonian remarked, "The world noted at once what he said, and will ...
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Abraham Lincoln's Thanksgiving Proclamation which Set the Precedent for America's National Day of Thanksgiving ...and the Woman Behind It

Abraham Lincoln’s Thanksgiving Proclamation which Set the Precedent for America’s National Day of Thanksgiving …and the Woman Behind It

Secretary of State William Seward wrote it and Abraham Lincoln issued it, but much of the credit for the proclamation should probably go to a woman named Sarah Josepha Hale. A prominent writer and editor, Hale had written the children’s poem “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” originally known as “Mary’s Lamb,” in 1830 and helped found the American Ladies Magazine, which she used a platform to ...
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The Civil War's Song of Inspiration: Patrick Gilmore's "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" is Deposited in the Library of Congress

The Civil War’s Song of Inspiration: Patrick Gilmore’s “When Johnny Comes Marching Home” is Deposited in the Library of Congress

Patrick Gilmore was a famous bandleader before the war. He served during wartime as bandmaster for the 22nd New York Regiment. Gilmore wrote this song under the name Louis Lambert. The melody was similar to several well known Irish folksongs. The song appealed to families on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line by offering hope that their sons and brothers and fathers would return safely from ...
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Abraham Lincoln's Proclamation Appointing a National Fast Day

Abraham Lincoln’s Proclamation Appointing a National Fast Day

Sarah J. Hale, a writer and the editor of a popular women’s magazine, Godey’s Ladies Journal, was born on October 24th, 1788 in Newport, New Hampshire. Her parents Gordon Buell and Martha Whittlesay Buell believed in equal education for both genders, so Sarah was home-schooled by her mother. Later, Sarah became a local schoolteacher and in 1813 she married a lawyer, David Hale. Together, Sarah and her husband formed a small literary ...
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Following the Battle of Antietam, President Lincoln Decides: "“The time for the annunciation of the emancipation policy can no longer be delayed."

Following the Battle of Antietam, President Lincoln Decides: ““The time for the annunciation of the emancipation policy can no longer be delayed.”

The Confederate Army was unstoppable – within weeks of winning the Civil War. General Robert E. Lee had won the Second Battle of Bull Run and was marching 55,000 Confederate troops into Maryland on Sept. 3, 1862. The Confederate Army was welcomed into Maryland as anti-Union protests had been filling Baltimore’s streets. On Sept. 13, 1862, President Lincoln met with Rev. William Patterson, Rev. John Dempster ...
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The Infamous 'Golden Afternoon' when Lewis Carroll Rowed his Boat up the Isis with Alice Liddell and sisters Telling the 'Alice in Wonderland' story

The Infamous ‘Golden Afternoon’ when Lewis Carroll Rowed his Boat up the Isis with Alice Liddell and sisters Telling the ‘Alice in Wonderland’ story

Alice was published in 1865, three years after Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (pseudonym Lewis Carroll) and the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed in a boat, on 4 July 1862 (this popular date of the "golden afternoon" might be a confusion or even another Alice-tale, for that particular day was cool, cloudy and rainy), up the Isis (Thames River) with the three young daughters of Henry Liddell (the Vice-Chancellor ...
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Abolitionist Julia Ward Howe's Inspiring Lyrics to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" are First Published in "The Atlantic Monthly'

Abolitionist Julia Ward Howe’s Inspiring Lyrics to “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” are First Published in “The Atlantic Monthly’

"The Battle Hymn of the Republic", also known as "Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory" outside of the United States, is a song by American writer Julia Ward Howe using the music from the song "John Brown's Body." Howe's more famous lyrics were written in November 1861, and first published in The Atlantic Monthly in February 1862. The song links the judgment of the wicked at ...
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The American Civil War Begins and Lasts Over 4 Years. Why Did the South Really go to War?

The American Civil War Begins and Lasts Over 4 Years. Why Did the South Really go to War?

On April 12, 1861, the war began when Brig. Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard opened fire on Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor forcing its surrender. In response to the attack, President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers to suppress the rebellion. While Northern states responded quickly, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas refused, opting to join the Confederacy instead. In July, Union forces commanded by Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell ...
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The 13th Amendment that Never Was! President Lincoln Sends a Form Letter to All State Governors to Amend the Constitution Guaranteeing States the Right to Own Slaves

The 13th Amendment that Never Was! President Lincoln Sends a Form Letter to All State Governors to Amend the Constitution Guaranteeing States the Right to Own Slaves

The discovery of a letter from newly inaugurated President Abraham Lincoln to the governor of Florida has generated renewed interest in Lincoln's views toward slavery. The letter, found at the Lehigh County Historical Society in Allentown, Pennsylvania, is a form letter from Lincoln to Governor Madison S. Perry transmitting "an authenticated copy of a Joint Resolution to amend the Constitution of the United States." On March ...
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South Carolina Secedes From the Union

South Carolina Secedes From the Union

The force of events moved very quickly upon the election of Lincoln. South Carolina acted first, calling for a convention to SECEDE from the Union. State by state, conventions were held, and the CONFEDERACY was formed. Within three months of Lincoln's election, seven states had seceded from the Union. Just as Springfield, Illinois celebrated the election of its favorite son to the Presidency on November 7, ...
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