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George Washington's Speech to the Delaware Chiefs: “You do well to wish to learn our arts and ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ.”

George Washington’s Speech to the Delaware Chiefs: “You do well to wish to learn our arts and ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ.”

The Speech to the Delaware Chiefs was an address given to the Delaware Nation by General George Washington on May 12, 1779, giving them news of the situation regarding the status of the American Revolution then being fought. Claimed to be a deist by modern liberalism, Washington had given numerous statements to the contrary; his writings reflect the "blessed religion" to which he was a part; ...
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Samuel Adams: "While the People are Virtuous They Cannot be Subdued; but Once They Lose Their Virtue They Will be Ready to Surrender Their Liberties"

Samuel Adams: “While the People are Virtuous They Cannot be Subdued; but Once They Lose Their Virtue They Will be Ready to Surrender Their Liberties”

Samuel Adams, in a letter to James Warren: A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but once they lose their virtue they will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader ...
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American Revolution: Louis XVI of France declares war on the Kingdom of Great Britain

American Revolution: Louis XVI of France declares war on the Kingdom of Great Britain

France entered the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) in 1778, and assisted in the victory of the Americans seeking independence from Britain (realized in the 1783 Treaty of Paris). The example of the American Revolution was one of the many contributing factors to the French Revolution. Following the American Declaration of Independence, the American Revolution was well received in France, both by the general population and the ...
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Battle of Monmouth and the Legend of Molly Pitcher

Battle of Monmouth and the Legend of Molly Pitcher

According to legend, at the Battle of Monmouth (June 28, 1778), Mary Hays, wife of artilleryman William Hays, carried water to cool both the cannon and the soldiers in her husband’s battery—hence the nickname “Molly Pitcher.” Legend also asserts that when William Hays collapsed or was wounded, she took her husband’s place in the gun crew for the rest of the battle. To write a biography of Molly Pitcher’s ...
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Gen. Washington: "To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to laud the more distinguished Character of Christian.”

Gen. Washington: “To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to laud the more distinguished Character of Christian.”

General Washington wrote at Valley Forge, May 2, 1778: “To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to laud the more distinguished Character of Christian.” ...
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Washington on His Ragged Army: "men without clothes to cover their nakedness, without blankets to lay on, without shoes... marching through frost and snow..."

Washington on His Ragged Army: “men without clothes to cover their nakedness, without blankets to lay on, without shoes… marching through frost and snow…”

Valley forge April 21st 1778 Dr Sir On saturday evening1 I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 16th Inst. I thank you very much for your obliging tender of a friendly intercourse between us; and you may rest assured, that I embrace it with chearfulness, and shall write you freely, as often as Leisure will permit, of such points as appear to me material ...
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Did Isaac Potts Really See Washington Pray at Valley Forge?

Did Isaac Potts Really See Washington Pray at Valley Forge?

One of the legends or myths of Valley Forge is that Washington prayed for his country here. We do not say that he did not pray at Valley Forge (he assuredly did), there simply is an open question as to how he did so and if he actually was witnessed in prayer. Although this article has been added with a date of January 17, 1778, the ...
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General Washington and his Troops arrive at Valley Forge

General Washington and his Troops arrive at Valley Forge

The images are heartrending, dramatic and so powerful that they are embedded in the nation's historical consciousness: Bloody footprints in the snow left by bootless men. Near naked soldiers wrapped in thin blankets huddled around a smoky fire of green wood. The plaintive chant from the starving: "We want meat! We want meat!" These are the indelible images of suffering and endurance associated with Valley Forge ...
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Quakeress and Ardent Patriot, Lydia Darragh, Risked her Life to Warn Washington of Secret British Plans for a Surprise Attack.”

Quakeress and Ardent Patriot, Lydia Darragh, Risked her Life to Warn Washington of Secret British Plans for a Surprise Attack.”

Lydia Darragh was a Quaker woman who crossed enemy lines during the British occupation of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her mission was to pass information to General George Washington and the Continental Army, warning them of an impending British attack. Lydia Barrington was born in 1729 in Dublin, Ireland. On November 2, 1753, she married the family tutor, William Darragh, the son of a clergyman. After a few years ...
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The Continental Congress made a National Thanksgiving Day Proclamation

The Continental Congress made a National Thanksgiving Day Proclamation

As printed in the Journals of Congress below... IN CONGRESS – November 1, 1777 Forasmuch as it is the indispensable duty of all men to adore the superintending providence of Almighty God; to acknowledge with gratitude their obligation to him for benefits received, and to implore such farther blessings as they stand in need of; and it having pleased him in his abundant mercy not only ...
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Congress Proposes Purchase of 20,000 Bibles

Congress Proposes Purchase of 20,000 Bibles

In colonial America, Bibles had to be imported from Britain, as the British government strictly regulated the printing of religious materials. It was illegal to print Bibles in the English language without a license from the king. In 1589, Queen Elizabeth I had granted Christopher Barker the title of Royal Printer, with the exclusive “perpetual royal privilege” to print Bibles in England. His son, Robert Barker, ...
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The Stars and Stripes are Born with the Passing of the Flag Act on June 14, 1777

The Stars and Stripes are Born with the Passing of the Flag Act on June 14, 1777

In the United States, Flag Day is observed on June 14, which commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States by a resolution of the Second Continental Congress on Saturday, June 14, 1777. Observance of this annual event, however, did not receive prominence for many years after the approval of the resolution of the Continental Congress. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation ...
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Sixteen-year-old Sybil Ludington Rides 40 Miles Waking up Patriots with the Urgent Warning that the British were Fast Approaching

Sixteen-year-old Sybil Ludington Rides 40 Miles Waking up Patriots with the Urgent Warning that the British were Fast Approaching

Sixteen-year-old Sybil Ludington rode 40 miles through Putnam and Dutchess Counties waking up patriots to join the militia, led by her father, Colonel Henry Ludington, delivering the urgent warning that the British had burned Danbury, Connecticut, and were fast approaching. Born in New York in 1761, Ludington was the eldest of Henry and Abigail’s twelve children. In addition to working as a farmer, Ludington’s father was ...
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John Adams: "Posterity! You Will Never Know, How Much it Cost the Present Generation, to Preserve Your Freedom! I Hope You Will Make a Good Use of It."

John Adams: “Posterity! You Will Never Know, How Much it Cost the Present Generation, to Preserve Your Freedom! I Hope You Will Make a Good Use of It.”

Letter from John Adams to Abigail Adams, Saturday Evening 26 April 1777 I have been lately more remiss, than usual in Writing to you. There has been a great Dearth of News. Nothing from England, nothing from France, Spain, or any other Part of Europe, nothing from the West Indies. Nothing from Howe, and his Banditti, nothing from General Washington. There are various Conjectures that Lord How ...
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George Washington Inspires a Tired and Defeated Army to Continue the Fight for Liberty

George Washington Inspires a Tired and Defeated Army to Continue the Fight for Liberty

George Washington faced a grim moment January 1, 1777. All enlistments for the Continental Army had expired on that date and all of the army, or at least what was left of it, was free to go home. This would not just cripple the Revolution, but probably end it. He gathered his troops together, the drum roll began, and the general asked all those willing to ...
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George Washington’s Crossing of the Delaware River in the Dead of the Night on Christmas

George Washington’s Crossing of the Delaware River in the Dead of the Night on Christmas

So why were Washington and his bedraggled Continental Army trying to cross an ice-choked Delaware River on a cold winter’s night? It wasn’t just to get to the other side. Washington’s aim was to conduct a surprise attack upon a Hessian garrison of roughly 1,400 soldiers located in and around Trenton, New Jersey. Washington hoped that a quick victory at Trenton would bolster sagging morale in ...
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Continental Congress Calls for a Day of Fasting and Humiliation for the Soldiers

Continental Congress Calls for a Day of Fasting and Humiliation for the Soldiers

Because of the distressing condition of the tattered but unbowed soldiers, the American Continental Congress called for a day of fasting and humiliation: Resolved, That it be recommended to all the United States, as soon as possible to appoint a day of solemn fasting and humiliation; to implore of Almighty God the forgiveness of the many sins prevailing among all ranks, and to beg the countenance and assistance ...
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The Heroics of Margaret Corbin, the First Woman in U.S. History to be Awarded a Military Pension.

The Heroics of Margaret Corbin, the First Woman in U.S. History to be Awarded a Military Pension.

A similar story to that of the famous Molly Pitcher is that of Margaret Cochran Corbin, wife of artilleryman John Corbin. On Nov. 16, 1776, John Corbin, along with 2,800 Continental soldiers, defended Manhattan’s Fort Washington, which was being attacked by 9,000 Hessian mercenary troops. Margaret Corbin was bringing water to swab the cannon, when her husband was killed. She immediately took his place at the ...
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Washington Crossing The East River and the Miracle at the Battle of Long Island

Washington Crossing The East River and the Miracle at the Battle of Long Island

There is not a famous painting of this river crossing on the night of August 29/30, 1776 unlike the crossing of the Delaware before the Battle of Trenton four months later (see The Jersey Campaign) but it was just as important for achieving American independence. In March 1776 the British abandoned Boston, sailing away to Nova Scotia.  There, they were reinforced and developed a plan to ...
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Delegates sign the Declaration of Independence

Delegates sign the Declaration of Independence

Members of Congress affixed their signatures to an enlarged copy of the Declaration of Independence a month after Congress had approved the declaration of independence from Britain. Fifty-six congressional delegates in total signed the document, including some who were not present at the vote approving the declaration. The delegates signed by state from North to South, beginning with Josiah Bartlett of New Hampshire and ending with ...
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GW: “The General hopes and trusts, that every officer and man, will endeavour so to live, and act, as becomes a Christian Soldier...”

GW: “The General hopes and trusts, that every officer and man, will endeavour so to live, and act, as becomes a Christian Soldier…”

When the Declaration of Independence was written, a copy was rushed out to Washington, who was fortifying New York City. He had it read to his troops, then ordered chaplains placed in each regiment, stating July 9, 1776: “The General hopes and trusts, that every officer and man, will endeavour so to live, and act, as becomes a Christian Soldier, defending the dearest Rights and Liberties ...
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The Liberty Bell is Rung in Philadelphia and the People Gathered to Hear the Reading of the Declaration of Independence

The Liberty Bell is Rung in Philadelphia and the People Gathered to Hear the Reading of the Declaration of Independence

The Liberty Bell got its name from being rung July 8, 1776, to call the citizens of Philadelphia together to hear the Declaration of Independence read out loud for the first time. The Liberty Bell, weighing over 2,000 pounds, was cast in England in August of 1752. The Pennsylvania Assembly ordered it to commemorate the 50th anniversary of William Penn founding the colony in 1701 and ...
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The Declaration of Independence Approved by Congress as 56 Courageous Signers "Pledge... Our Lives, Our Fortunes, and Our Sacred Honor."

The Declaration of Independence Approved by Congress as 56 Courageous Signers “Pledge… Our Lives, Our Fortunes, and Our Sacred Honor.”

When the First Continental Congress adjourned in October of 1774, the delegates agreed to meet again in Philadelphia on May 5, 1775. Between the First and the Second Continental Congress, many events happened that increased the tensions between the British and the Colonists. The battles of Lexington and Concord, the Colonist defeat in Quebec. The Colonists tried to establish their rights and to fight against the British oppressive taxation ...
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The 2nd United American Republic: 'The United States Continental Congress' was founded by 12 states (New York abstained until July 8th)

The 2nd United American Republic: ‘The United States Continental Congress’ was founded by 12 states (New York abstained until July 8th)

Second United American Republic is founded: The United States Continental Congress (USCC) was formed by 12 colonies with the passage of the Resolution for Independency on July 2nd, 1776 and expired on February 28th, 1781, with the Articles of Confederation’s enactment on March 1st, 1781. There was no constitution and the republic was governed under the acts passed by the Continental Congress with each State having one ...
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General Washington to his Army: "Let us rely upon the goodness of the cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being in whose hands victory is..."

General Washington to his Army: “Let us rely upon the goodness of the cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being in whose hands victory is…”

On July 2, 1776, from his headquarters in New York, General Washington issued his general orders: “The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness ...
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"The First U.S. Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington

“The First U.S. Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington

Best-selling author Brad Meltzer found the story behind his latest book, "The First Conspiracy: The Secret Plot to Kill George Washington," in a footnote. He said he took the surprising information to Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph Ellis. "I went to him and I said, 'Did this really happen?' And it really happened. When it happened, George Washington rounded up those responsible. He took one of the ...
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John Adams: "...It is Religion and Morality Alone, Which can Establish the Principles upon which Freedom can Securely Stand."

John Adams: “…It is Religion and Morality Alone, Which can Establish the Principles upon which Freedom can Securely Stand.”

Letter to Zabdiel Adams (21 June 1776) My dear Sir, Philadelphia June 21.1776 Your Favour of the Ninth of this Month was delivered to me,(1) Yesterday by Mr. Whitney, whose Health I hope will be fully restored by the Small Pox for which he was innoculated the day before. Your Letter, Sir, gave me great Pleasure and deserves my most hearty Thanks. I am fully with ...
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George Washington Writes in a Letter to his Brother, "Providence Which Has in Many Instances Appear’d for Us, Will Still Go On to Afford Its Aid"

George Washington Writes in a Letter to his Brother, “Providence Which Has in Many Instances Appear’d for Us, Will Still Go On to Afford Its Aid”

On May 31, 1776, George Washington wrote to his younger brother John Augustine Washington, We expect a very bloody Summer of it at New York. … We are not either in Men, or Arms, prepare